Follow the Money – Part one: The European Parliament

MILLIONS of taxpayers money will be spent by the EU parliament (EP) in order to generate engagement for the “Conference on the Future of Europe”.

This blog can EXCLUSIVELY report on two “calls for proposals” that were made by the EP last Summer. The “calls for proposals” are an invitation for those desiring to get some EP cash to then generate engagement for “CoFoE”.

Are you interested in receiving some EP money? Sorry, too late. The deadline has already passed.

AMAZINGLY, the calls were not published on the website of the “Conference on the Future of Europe” itself. They were only published in some dark corner of the European Parliament’s website, which is possibly even more of an impenetrable maze than the European Parliament’s buildings.

This raises very serious questions.

Who was able to get their hands on the money? Were they tipped off that money would be available?

Social media activity indicates that only EU-fanatic pressure groups are engaging with this event. Were they the only ones receiving EP cash to generate engagement?

Screenshot of call for proposal published by the European Parliament

Only by the 30th of June, we’ll be able to discover who has won these EP grants. That’s two full months after the Conference platform to engage has opened up to the public. That’s if the European Parliament, which is not known to be overly respectful of these kind of deadlines, complies with the rules;

IF IT APPEARS that only EU-funded groups that incessantly promote more power for the EU were the ones able to get their hands on the EP cash, that would mean that the “Conference on the Future of Europe” would have been compromised as FUNDAMENTALLY BIASED from its very start.

How much EU-funding all kinds of EU groups receive to generate engagement and participation is something which should be disclosed in the spirit of full transparency.

Perhaps, it is no wonder that MEPs have voted AGAINST financial transparency for the Conference, as we also disclosed.

On top of all this, taxpayers will also need to pay for what the EU Commission and the EU Council plan to spend to promote the Conference. This is still unclear as well. A qualified guess would be that it would amount to 1 or 2 times the amount the European Parliament spends. One EU insider thinks the Conference could in the end cost Europeans “an estimated €200m”.

It is bad enough that hard pressed European taxpayers need to pay for this, but it would be even more scandalous if the money would be diverted to groups promoting ever more power for the EU.

Call for proposals COMM/SUBV/2020/M for the co-financing of media actions under the multi-annual work programme for grants in the area of communication 2020-2021

Call for proposals COMM/SUBV/2020/E for the co-financing of citizens’ engagement actions under the multi-annual work programme for grants in the area of communication 2020-2021

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